March152014

halffacedwhiteboy:

bourbonandbiscuits:

And third, I cut three penises out of this movie. Not because of the MPAA. I actually did it before we even submitted it for ratings. One, because an actor politely asked me not to include it. The second, believe it or not, was ultimately too distracting from the moment, and I was wanting you to emotionally experience a moment with one of the characters, but instead you were looking at their junk. But third, one of them was there for a character reason. It’s the one that’s included in the deleted scenes. -John Krokidas

Jack, if that was you I stg…

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More like… 

"The second, believe it or not, was ultimately too distracting from the moment, and I was wanting you to emotionally experience a moment with one of the characters, but instead you were looking at their junk.”

February12014

Fargo (1996)

(Source: neveralright, via haroldlloyds)

December222013

The Meaning and Symbolism of Flowers in Boardwalk Empire

metronomeblue:

Part 1/??

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Red Carnations, as constantly worn by Nucky Thompson (like here in the Pilot)  mean ‘Alas! my poor heart!’, which alludes directly to his (also) constant manpain.

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Dean O’Banion, in season three episode one resolution, brings a bouquet of flowers made up of ferns, gladiolus and baby’s breath to a meeting with Al Capone and Johnny Torrio. Gladiolus, the flower of gladiators, can also mean sincerity, strength of character, or severed ties. Because deaf kid jokes don’t make friends, Dean. Baby’s Breath is often used to symbolize festivity, but interestingly (and fittingly) all parts of the plant are poisonous when dried. The ferns O’Banion uses as filler are symbols of protection and safety, (which he certainly needs later on in the episode).

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And now, for some Harrowfeels, we have Richard giving Julia white lilies, which mean sweetness, as well as beauty, hope and life. Because that scene couldn’t possibly make me any happier.

(via halffacedwhiteboy)

9PM
albinoalli:

I sketched this before I watched S04 E05, and I intended to finish coloring someday.
And I watched finale, That’s not gonna happen. I can’t. I just can’t.
You know what I’m saying.

the dog.

albinoalli:

I sketched this before I watched S04 E05, and I intended to finish coloring someday.

And I watched finale, That’s not gonna happen. I can’t. I just can’t.

You know what I’m saying.

the dog.

(via fortuneandthestars)

whyyyy 

9PM

It occurred to me the basis of fiction is that people have some sort of connection with each other. 

But they don’t.

(Source: deanobanion)

9PM
December32013

halffacedwhiteboy:

also i should’ve said this when the first episode aired but i was just in so much shock and so uncomfortable about it jesus

my friend who i mentioned earlier, who is the the MOST offensive person in the world, and another friend of mine, had come over to watch the premiere with gramma and i

and you know the dunn scene in 4.01, with that nasty white couple.. yea. well that really pissed both of them off. kid literally said “this is offensive.” like, you cannot bother these two. they don’t care. but tw managed to do it anyway. 

racially motivated rape of a regular side character is not edgy and different, it’s just fucking gross. especially to two young black boys who are in your target age demographic.

so good job tw, good job. you did it. you made an impression.

ugh

It’s historically accurate though. It is gross and controversial, but I don’t think the writers are above picking and choosing which of the 1920s US non-niceties the viewers would like to see.

Just because they’re taking creative license with history by creating a non-plausible fairly wealthy, fairly well-recieved African-American in a predominately white community, like Chalky, doesn’t mean they’re going to create an alternate universe where Chalky and Dunn don’t experience the absolutely vile side of being an African American in the 1920s US. 

I agree its gross, but it was necessary, especially when establishing Narcisse and part of the New Negro Movement. He’s African American vying for the betterment of the “Libyan” and the downfall of the “lesser Africans” from within its own community (a character who reflects the still-lingering racial divide within the African-American community today). The situation and Narcisse’s involvement is important to this time period, especially if the writers are going to continue on with Hoover’s involvement in the story. 

Hoover wasn’t above using people against causes in their favors, as I discussed in my post where I mentioned his homosexual spy ring. Later on in his career, he would reduce jail time or even free African-American convicts if they agreed to infiltrate the Black Panthers and introduce drugs, violence, and sexual disease in order to discredit an otherwise fairly peaceful Civil Rights movement among white citizens glued to the blooming enterprise of the 24-hour news cycle. Here’s a link to an article about Fred Hampton, an African American man assassinated and demonized so that white men could get away with an awful crime (orchestrated by none other than Hoover).

We’re seeing the beginnings of Hoover’s attempt to destroy the African-American community within and without before he even thinks of doing it, by giving us the “rape” scene with Dunn and the Pastors, which leads us to Narcisse, which lead to the finale, which leads to a probable season five plot line.

TL;DR: It’s gross and awful, but that’s life in the 1920’s accurately depicted and it’s probably important to the story.

December22013

Boardwalk Empire - Characters that need to interact (2/?) :
Esther Randolph and Gillian Darmody

Reason #3145 Why Boardwalk Empire, despite being awesome, doesn’t pass the Bechdel Test

Boardwalk Empire - Characters that need to interact (2/?) :

Esther Randolph and Gillian Darmody

Reason #3145 Why Boardwalk Empire, despite being awesome, doesn’t pass the Bechdel Test

(Source: mysticjc, via halffacedwhiteboy)

November262013
November252013

michele023:

Ok somebody explain this to me - they’re blackmailing Narcisse to get him to be an informant on Mr Garvey? in exchange for not deporting him - fine. But if they’re blaming Agent Tolliver’s death on an unidentified colored person - wouldn’t Eli be off the hook? and are they just doing this because they don’t like Agent Tolliver and they don’t give a shit if somebody murdered him - they’re just gonna use the situation to their advantage? O_o Explain, please. Why would they just let Eli go? and how do they know he’s dead? did they find his body? They never showed it - I don’t get it. Eli usually buries em in a hole out in the boonies. 

Does nobody know anything about Hoover?

The guy purposely sought out every closeted gay employee of every level in Washington and blackmailed them into being a part of his Gay Spy Ring. And he was gay himself. 

He bugged the shit out of all the presidents. He knew about MLK’s assassination and said nothing about it. He even planted spies in peaceful Civil Rights protests and drugs in African American communities to make them look like savage animals.

Hilariously, Hoover didn’t believe in organized crime. He thought it could never exist, though he did keep tabs on it and arrested those the public was pressuring him to, like John Dillinger and Machine Gun Kelly.

Essentially, Hoover didn’t care about justice. He cared about information and power. As long as he had all the information, he had all the power. He just didn’t give a fuck about anybody. Everyone was expendable.

(via flappersandfedoras-deactivated2)

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